Living in Day-Tight Compartments

rock_odatA piece of advice often heard in 12-step programs is to learn to live “one day at a time.” Striving to live one day at a time has been said millions of times in Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-step rooms for over 75 years. Practicing this suggestion can be difficult, especially for people who want to stop drinking. But this principle is essential in recovering from alcoholism and addiction. Continue reading “Living in Day-Tight Compartments”

Moment of Clarity

sky-214844_640Alcoholism* is often described as a three-fold disease – mental, physical, and spiritual. The mental aspect of the disease of alcoholism is characterized by denial and delusion thoughts. Family members and friends are often amazed that, despite severe consequences such as arrests, divorces and physical deterioration, the alcoholic continues to drink. The defense mechanisms of denial and delusional thinking are so powerful that the active alcoholic cannot comprehend the reality of their situation. Continue reading “Moment of Clarity”

Improv Comedy – Play for the Health!

Margot Escott, LCSW, has been studying, performing and teaching Improv Comedy for the past several years for healthcare organizations and community groups. Escott has had a private psychotherapy practice in Naples for over 30 years and is known for her workshops on “The Healing Power of Humor & Play.”

The basic rules of Improv Comedy can also be applied to life and the therapeutic process. The most important rule of Improv is to accept what other players give you and to have fun. With the help of other professional Improv Players at this workshop, participants will experience how these concepts can apply to their lives as well. Audience participation not required but suggested.

Click to view a list of current classes

The workshop will include live Improv Comedy performance and audience participation in “win/win” Improv Games.

Caregivers need care themselves for the challenges of a disabled loved one

By Nori St. Paul
Published on: 6/30/2013

Not long ago, Naples resident Shirley Hubers became an adult caregiver. Her husband Dave, who recently turned 70, had had a tough time this past couple of years.

Since 2011, he has had a challenging double knee replacement. Then he suffered a heart attack. During his heart problems, Dave’s body went into septic shock and he was induced into a coma. He had triple bypass surgery, and then suffered a knee infection, followed by removal of one of the artificial knees, adding a spacer, and then a new replacement some time later.

Continue reading “Caregivers need care themselves for the challenges of a disabled loved one”